Questions Home Buyers Ask Most

My standard home inspection is visual examination of the home's major structure, systems and components that are visible and safely accessible. My  report will cover the condition of the home’s heating system; central air conditioning system (temperature permitting); interior plumbing and electrical systems; the roof, attic and visible insulation; walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors; the foundation, basement and structural components. After the inspection I will provide you with a electronic report, which will include photos and recommendations, of my findings of the inspection.

 

The international Association of Certified Home Inspectors publishes a Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics that outlines what I cover in your home inspection report.

What Does A Home Inspection Cover?

Buying a home is typically the biggest investment you will ever make, so it's important to get a home inspection because a inspector should be able to discover and document defects that may or may not be obvious to you as a prospective buyer.  Such defects can range from simple replacements or repairs, to severe damage or safety and health concerns. Additionally, most mortgage companies require a home inspection on a property before approving the home loan.

More and more sellers are choosing to have a thorough inspection before or when they first list their home. First and foremost, you should have a home inspection for full disclosure. You will have demonstrated that you did all you could do to reveal any defects within the home. Second, you will save money and hassle by knowing now what your defects are, not after you have already negotiated a price and are faced with costly repairs discovered on the buyer’s inspection. Defects found before the buyer comes along allow you to shop around for a contractor and not deal with inflated estimates that a buyer will present.

Why should I get a home inspection?

It is important to choose a home inspector who is qualified and holds a license or certification in the field. Many jurisdictions do not regulate home inspections, meaning that anyone could call themselves a home inspector, the State of Michigan is one of them. The International Association of Certified Home Inspectors – InterNACHI®– is the largest and most trusted home inspector association in the world.

How can I be sure that a home inspector is qualified?

There are multiple factors that adjust the prices of my Inspections. Square Footage is a big factor. The bigger the house the longer I’ll take and more to inspect. Age of the home is another factor. Older homes or historic homes may cost more to inspect than newer construction. An older home may take longer to inspect due to wear and tear, especially if the house has undergone extensive renovations or additions over its lifetime. Additional services added on. I offer other inspections and testing services that you can add on. All adjusting price and time.

How much does a home inspection cost?

When should I schedule a home inspection?

A home inspection is usually scheduled after an offer has been made and accepted, but before the closing date. That way, I can rule out any major defects that could be dangerous or costly. In rare cases—due to timing or contractual issues—the inspection can be scheduled after the closing date. If this is the case, the home buyer should schedule the inspection for the earliest possible date after closing.

I recommend my all clients to be at the inspection. This isn’t mandatory but by being at the inspection this allows you to ask any questions you had or point out any areas of concerns. You will certainly gain a better understanding of the home's condition, which will give you insight into its potential sale points and defects. Additionally, you will likely learn information about the home's maintenance, systems and components that may provide useful for the transaction. 

Should I be present for the inspection?

I do not fix anything during the inspection. This is not recommended. I follow InterNACHI’s Code of Ethics and it states:

The InterNACHI member shall not perform or offer to perform, for an additional fee, any repairs or associated services to the structure for which the member or member's company has prepared a home inspection report for a period of 12 months. This provision shall not include services to components and/or systems that are not included in the InterNACHI Standards of Practice. 

If an inspector financially benefits from finding any defects, what’s stopping them from creating defects to add on money to their bill. This can impact the accuracy of the report (whether intentional or not). 

Can the home inspector also repair any defects?

If your home inspection reveals any problems, it is important to understand the severity of the defect. For example, a missing shingle or dirty air filter can be easily fixed at a low cost. However, if the defect is more extreme, such as a major foundation crack, wood-destroying organism infestation, or evidence of mold, you should find out how these problems can be addressed, and whether you can negotiate their cost with the seller.

What happens if the inspection reveals problems?

No. A professional home inspection is an examination of the current condition of a house. It is not an appraisal, which determines market value. It is not a municipal inspection, which verifies local code compliance. A home inspector, therefore, will not pass or fail a house, but rather describe its physical condition and indicate what components and systems may need major repair or replacement.

Can a house fail a home inspection?

Buying a home is typically the biggest investment you will ever make, so it's important to get a home inspection because a inspector should be able to discover and document defects that may or may not be obvious to you as a prospective buyer.  Such defects can range from simple replacements or repairs, to severe damage or safety and health concerns. Additionally, most mortgage companies require a home inspection on a property before approving the home loan.

Why should I get a home inspection?

Buying a home is typically the biggest investment you will ever make, so it's important to get a home inspection because a inspector should be able to discover and document defects that may or may not be obvious to you as a prospective buyer.  Such defects can range from simple replacements or repairs, to severe damage or safety and health concerns. Additionally, most mortgage companies require a home inspection on a property before approving the home loan.

Do I need a home inspection for a new construction?

A home inspection is not protection against future failures. Stuff happens! Components like air conditioners and Heat Systems can and will break down. A home inspection tells you the condition of the component at the time the component was inspected. For protection from future failure you may want to consider a home warranty.

A home inspection is not an appraisal that determines the value of a home. Nor will a home inspector tell you if you should buy this home or what to pay for this home.

A home inspection is not a code inspection, which verifies local building code compliance. A home inspector will not pass or fail a house. Homes built before code revisions are not obligated to comply with the code for homes built today. Home inspectors will report findings when it comes to safety concerns that may be in the current code such as underground outlets above sinks. A home inspector thinks "Safety" not "Code" when performing a home inspection.

What should I NOT expect from a home inspection?

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